Tag Archives: fuzzibunz

Cloth Diaper Test Drive

testdriveThinking about cloth diapering or interested in trying out a few brands? Then, the cloth diaper test drive is for you!

  • Select any of the brand new diapers below (customer favorites!) and we will send them to you lickity split.
  • Wash them and use them for 21 days.
  • You decide whether to keep them all, keep some and return some, or return them all. It’s that easy!

For more information check out our website

FuzziBunz Cloth Diaper Update!

If you’ve been trolling for FuzziBunz One-Size Elites, you will notice that at New & Green they are currently out of stock and similarly so with other cloth diaper retailers.

Why you might ask? FuzziBunz is releasing a brand new version of their one-size cloth diaper. We are hoping to be able to order the new diapers towards the end of January, assuming no production delays (which can happen in the world of cloth diapers!).

Rumor has it the new FuzziBunz one-size diapers will be reverting back to the microfiber inserts, and they will also feature a wider stuffing area so your hand doesn’t get stuck in it. The other benefit of the re-design means that most standard inserts will fit into the FuzziBunz cloth diapers moving forward, making it much easier to change out your inserts, add extra ones, and so forth.

We are super excited to see the new version and cannot wait until it arrives. It won’t be long now until the newest version of this long-time favorite cloth diaper hits the shelves.

 

FuzziBunz, Fuzzi Bunz, Fuzzibunz cloth diapers

Cloth Diapering Milestones: When to Move Up a Snap Setting on Your One-Size Diapers

 

As your baby moves from those tiny infant days to the big run-around toddler days, different size cloth diapers take care of all your cloth diapering needs. If you’ve chosen to use one-size diapers,  obviously you’ll need to decide when to change the snap settings to get the best sizing at every step of the way. If you’re at one of times, congratulations on this milestone in your baby’s growth!

Here are few things to watch out for to know it’s time to change to the next snap setting:

When the rise falls below the top of the hips, you know the diaper no longer comes up high enough to provide adequate coverage on the front of the diaper. The “rise” is the height of the diaper in the front – this often indicates the the back of the diaper is a bit short as well, so it’s definitely helpful to extend the rise at this point by moving up one snap setting.

When the leg openings become tight, that can also be an indication that the diaper is on the small side. Leg openings should be somewhat snug in order to keep messes where they belong, but if you can no longer fit one finger in between the leg elastic and your baby’s leg or if the elastic is leaving significant indentations in your baby’s skin, then it’s time to re-evaluate.

It should be noted, however, that tight leg openings can occur for other reasons, as well, so you should check out other fit issues before changing your snap settings. If you have a wonderfully chubby baby, the legs will probably become tight before the rise becomes too short, while if you have a long legged, lanky babe, the leg openings may never become too tight before it’s time to switch. Tight leg openings are merely a companion symptom. (Leg openings should never gap, however, so look for a different culprit if changing the snap setting results in gaps around

the legs!)

However, if the diaper is tight around the waist and difficult to get on, that’s a good sign that your baby is ready to move to the next snap setting.

bumgeniusonesize

bumGenius One-Size Guide

If pee regularly starts leaking over the top of the diaper, regardless of the rise, it may be time to change the snap setting. This can be due to a boy who tends to point upward or a girl who sleeps on her front – however, before you decide that changing snap settings is the best way to solve this problem, consider doing some “problem solving” by making sure to tuck your boy downward when you change him or by adding extra absorbancy to the front of your girl’s diaper.

The makers of BumGenius, one of the most popular one-size diapers on the market today, offer a helpful comment to keep in mind as well:
Remember, babies change shape frequently as they grow up. You may have times when your relatively young baby is using their one-size diapers on the largest setting. The same child may be on the medium setting several months later due to increased mobility.

FuzziBunz One-Size Guide

Also, one extra note for those of you who use Fuzzi Bunz One-Size diapers:

Even though Fuzzi Bunz’s version of the one-size diaper uses elastic instead of snaps to change sizing, these guidelines still apply. However, the elastics allow more settings than snaps do, so you may choose to adjust them more or less often, according to what works best for you and your child. If you ever find yourself trying to find the “right” adjustment for your child, use this handy chart to find suggestions that may work for you.

Here’s the best to all you fantastic mamas as your child grows and hits many milestones in the first few years of life!

Ask N&G: I have a HE Washer. Will this work with Cloth Diapers?

hewashingmachineIn the grand discussion of concern for the environment, cloth diapers and high-efficiency washers are two topics that come up often. Yet many wonder if these two – while each a great action to save the environment on its own – are mutually exclusive. Since HE washers run their cycles with very little water, is it possible to use cloth diapers and actually get them clean?

Cloth diapering is certainly do-able with an HE washer – you just need a little creativity. Ironically, washing cloth diapers in an HE washer doesn’t run the washer at its most efficient.

The key to getting your diapers clean, regardless of the type of washer, is water, water, water. Water is the only way to rid them of urine, residues, and odors. Thus, with an HE washer, you want to make sure there’s enough water in the wash cycle to ensure the diapers aren’t just flopping around!

For example, if you look into your wash window when you’re washing a load of clothes, you’ll likely see a couple of inches of water at the bottom of the wash tub. However, if you look in while you’re washing diapers, there’s typically no or very little extra water to see. This is because your lovely diapers are so absorbent that they soak up all the wash water provided. Thus, you need to figure out how to get extra water in the tub. There are a few ways to do this:

Use a no-spin pre-rinse. If your machine can do a rinse cycle without draining out the water at the end, run that cycle right before the wash cycle.

Know how to “trick” your machine. You can also trick your machine into thinking there’s more to wash than there actually is. Add in a pair of jeans or a towel to the wash cycle to get more water added to the cycle – jeans work especially well since they don’t absorb as much as a towel does.

Run multiple cycles. We find that it often works best to run two cold rinse cycles, one extra-long hot wash with Country Save or Rockin’ Green detergent, then two final cold rinse cycles. The first pre-rinse gets rid of urine and gunk, the second pre-rinse preps the diapers for the wash, the wash gets the diapers clean, then the two final rinses ensures there is no detergent or other build-up left on the diapers to keep them as absorbent as possible.

Use diapers that fit your wash routine. Traditional pockets and all-in-ones are the most difficult to keep clean in an HE washer. Pockets like FuzziBunz can be problematic because they’re so light they trigger very little water into the drum. Traditional AIO’s like the Blueberry One-Size Simplex Cloth Diaper are difficult because they require lots of agitation to get sufficient water through them to actually get them spankin’ clean. Diapers that work especially WELL in an HE washer are Tots Bots Easy Fit All in One Cloth Diaper, Thirsites hemp and Bummi’s organic cotton prefolds, as well as many of the newer AIO’s.

Wash often. Most people who use HE washers report that their diapers get the cleanest when they run small loads and wash every day or two. However, in the effort to keep things as efficient as possible, we still recommend washing every two to three days if you can. That way you don’t have to run your machine as often and you don’t have to keep as many diapers on hand.

As you can see, creativity is the name of the game to being successful with an high-efficiency washer – and you cloth diapering mamas are some of the most resourceful, creative people we know! Our hats are off to you!

Leaking Diapers? Common Reasons AND Fixes

cryingbabyOne of the most common frustrations for cloth diapering parents and one of the most common reasons we know of why parents decide to quit cloth diapering is leaks.

But leaks are fixable – and often easily so. Read on for a checklist to see how you can keep your baby AND his clothes dry.

Typically, leaks happen because of issues related to fit, size, absorbency, or because bits of the diaper are peeking outside the diaper cover.
Also, leaks commonly happen when a baby is “in between” sizes or when a “one-size” diaper is too big on an itty-bitty newborn.
Let’s look at each of these scenarios by itself:

FIT: Each baby’s shape and size is different. Some babies are long and lean and some have those lovely rolls of baby fat around their thighs. Thus, even though two babies may be the same weight, the same diaper will fit them differently. Basically, just make sure that once your diaper is on that there are no gaps anywhere around the thighs or back of your baby. Everything should be tight, snug, and secure (and don’t worry – it’s difficult to get a diaper too tight.)

A second, though less common, “fit” issue is with how a diaper is sewn in the legs. On some babies, certain diapers will tend to “roll up” at the thighs and this can cause liquid to wick out. If you see any “inner” part of the diaper showing, such as fleece or cotton, try to roll it or tuck it back into place.

SIZE: It may seem obvious, but make sure you’re using the right size diaper. If the diaper is too big, there will be gaps around the legs or back where pee and poo can escape. (Gaps may be obvious or not. Basically, if you can easily fit more than one finger in between the elastic of the diaper and your baby’s leg, liquids will have no problem getting out.)

Likewise, if the diaper is too small, the elastic around the legs and back may get stretched too much and they can’t do their job of containing everything. Often diapers that are too small also have a very low rise over the crotch. Especially with boys, this can mean there’s just not enough diaper where the liquid wants to go and the leaks will happen at the front.

The fix? Check for gaps, over-stretched elastic, and your diaper’s rise and adjust which size diaper you use accordingly. If you are “in between” sizes, where a “small” is too small and a “medium” is too big, consider adding a bit of bulk, such as a doubler, or changing the brand or type of cover you use, which often fit differently, to get you through those two or three interim weeks.

ABSORBENCY: As a baby goes from a newborn to toddler, the amount and frequency of the baby’s wetting changes. Typically, as a baby grows she will pee less often but with a greater quantity. Thus, make sure you are using a diaper with adequate absorbency for your baby. If you need to increase the absorbency but aren’t ready to switch to a different size, add a doubler or two.  Also, if you use pocket diapers, consider adding an entire prefold or flatfor night time leaks.

“TUCKAGE”: This one is especially easy to fix and is incredibly common, even among experienced cloth diaperers. “Tuckage,” while perhaps not even a real word (darn!), merely refers to the times when a bit of the diaper doesn’t get tucked into the cover during the diaper change. Especially when you’ve got a wiggly baby, it can be difficult to remember to check that everything is tucked securely inside the cover, but this one step will make sure everything stays dry!

BAGGY ONE-SIZE DIAPERS ON NEWBORNS: One-size cloth diapers can be real budget-savers and a great way to only have to buy diapers once in your baby’s diapering lifetime. However, they can be too baggy in the newborn days. In this case, we recommend adding a hemp/cotton cloth wipe folded in half. This will add some bulk, but it will improve the fit until your baby fills out the diaper a bit more.

Here are a few products that seem to excel at keeping frustrating leaks at bay:
FuzziBunz UNIQUE one-size cloth diaper
Bummis Super Brite covers
Tots Bots Easy Fit All in One cloth diaper in Hook & Loop or Snaps

Have you solved your leaking problems in a creative way? Please let us know! We’d love to pass your advice on to other parents.